Australia

Australia to spend nearly $1 billion to boost cyber security

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during a joint press conference held with New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern at Admiralty House in Sydney, Australia, February 28, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott/File Photo

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia will spend A$1.35 billion ($926.1 million) over the next 10 years to boost its cyber security defences, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Tuesday, as Canberra seeks to combat a wave of attacks.

The announcement comes just weeks after Australia said a “sophisticated state-based actor” has been attacking all levels of the government, political bodies, essential service providers and operators of critical infrastructure.

Although Australia has declined to say who it believed was responsible for the attacks, three sources briefed on the matter told Reuters the country believed China was responsible, a suggestion swiftly dismissed by Beijing.

“The federal government’s top priority is protecting our nation’s economy, national security and sovereignty. Malicious cyber

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Google to pay some publishers in Australia, Brazil, Germany for content

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Google is seen in Davos, Switzerland Januar 20, 2020. Picture taken January 20, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Alphabet’s Google on Thursday took a step to resolving its spat with publishers, saying it would pay some media groups in Australia, Brazil and Germany for high-quality content and expects to do more deals with others.

The U.S. internet giant has for years tried to fend off demands for payment from news publishers worldwide in return for using their content, with European media groups among their fiercest critics.

“Today, we are announcing a licensing programme to pay publishers for high-quality content for a news experience launching later this year,” Brad Bender, Google’s vice-president for news, said in a blogpost.

“We will start with publishers in a number of countries around the globe, with more to come soon,” he said.

The new product will be available on

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Australia sees China as main suspect in state-based cyberattacks, sources say

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia views China as the chief suspect in a spate of cyber-attacks of increasing frequency in recent months, three sources familiar with the government’s thinking told Reuters on Friday.

The comments came after Prime Minister Scott Morrison said a “sophisticated state-based actor” had spent months trying to hack all levels of the government, political bodies, essential service providers and operators of critical infrastructure.

“We know it is a sophisticated state-based cyber actor because of the scale and nature of the targeting,” Morrison told reporters in the capital, Canberra, but declined to say who Australia believed was responsible.

Three sources briefed on the matter said Australia believed China is responsible, however.

“There is a high degree of confidence that China is behind the attacks,” one Australian government source told Reuters, seeking anonymity as he was not authorised to speak to media.

China’s embassy in Canberra did not immediately

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Australia says it has been target of ‘state-based’ cyberattacks

SYDNEY (Reuters) – A “sophisticated state-based actor” has been attempting to hack a wide range of Australian organisations for months and had stepped up its efforts recently, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Friday.

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during a joint press conference held with New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern at Admiralty House in Sydney, Australia, February 28, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

The attacks have targeted all levels of the government, political organisations, essential service providers and operators of other critical infrastructure, Morrison said in a media briefing in Canberra.

“We know it is a sophisticated state-based cyber actor because of the scale and nature of the targeting,” he said.

Morrison said there were not a lot of state actors that could launch this sort of attack, but Australia will not identify which country was responsible.

Australia’s Defence Minister Linda Reynolds said advice showed no large-scale

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